13. Supply data to be enhanced for own use

Supply copies of the library’s data in return for access to enriched metadata.

Description

Activity - The structured nature of library data makes it eminently suitable for automated enrichment in a variety of ways, from identifying alternative versions of a particular work (paperback, hardback, e-book, etc) to adding associated content such as book jacket images, tables of contents, and reviews. Where such enrichment is maintained by third parties, it is often easiest to supply those third parties with copies of the library’s data (even if just an ISBN list) in return for access to the enrichments.
This use case differs from UC12 because it is about exploitation of catalogue data by users without a return path to the library whereas UC12 is about a process intended to benefit the catalogues.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Actors - Libraries, external services
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Data involved - It depends which enrichments are being sought, but typically some subset of the bibliographic record
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Data flow - Bibliographic data are supplied to the external service for matching and enrichment. Records containing the enhancements (or, perhaps, just links to those enhancements on a third party site) are then transferred back to the library. If it is an area of concern, libraries should ensure that they understand whether or not the external service will keep a copy of the original data.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Does this require Open Data - There is no requirement for Open Data. Indeed, mingling of creative works (subjective reviews, book jackets), commercially licensed data (such as Table of Contents) and Open bibliographic data may have the potential to complicate downstream reuse by all parties.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Current Examples - LibraryThing covers service
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Benefits

Institution - More compelling, engaging, competitive library services
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Library Service - (1) More compelling, engaging, competitive library services; (2) xISBN-type services may increase utilization of stock (e.g. directing those who searched for an unheld monograph to the available ebook version)
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Researchers - Table of Contents has some value; however, it is not clear that such as reviews have anything other than cosmetic value in this context.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Students - Table of Contents has some value; such enhancements as reviews may have greater value in this context.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Replication - High: Third party service providers have a requirement to make the iterative process as quick, easy and painless as possible.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Case for not doing it - Recurring cost.
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Motivation

Principles - Creation of more completely described and more compelling library resources
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Costs - Cost benefits may arise subject to the service engaged, which may be free or a value added part of a broader subscription or membership arrangement
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Services - Principally a richer and stickier OPAC
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Rationale for not doing it - None, other than an ongoing cost for access to the enrichment data and the resources to load it
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Consequences of doing it as Open Data

What will happen? - Library systems supporting the enrichments will be more engaging, and possibly more informative.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Potential Risks - (1) Loss of control over institutional data; (2) It will be too difficult to incorporate enrichments into existing systems; (3) Third party providers of enrichments will become scarce; (4) Third party providers of enrichments will not be sufficiently rigorous, leading to false matches; (5) Increased visibility of collection leads to demand beyond local resources ability to supply [see also UC3, UC4, UC5, UC6, UC7, UC9, UC16, UC17].
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Potential Opportunities - (1) Development of innovative / compelling third party services based on open data; (2) Increased use of library collection by internal and external users through improved discovery services [see also UC3, UC4, UC5, UC6, UC7, UC9, UC16, UC17].
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Consequences of not doing it? - Possible decline in use arising from preference for alternative services such as Amazon or Google Book Search, which provide richer search experience and more engaging UI.
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Rights and Licensing Issues

Rights and licensing issues - This is likely to involve an external organization and therefore the following considerations should be actively addressed ahead of selecting the service. (1) Does the institution own the enrichments in perpetuity (i.e. What happens when it stops paying if this is part of a subscription service?); (2) Does the external provider have any continuing right to hold or use data supplied to them by the library for enrichment? (3) Where can content be used? e.g. Book jacket image use within VLE? (4) What is the impact of integrating additional data with existing records, and how does this affect the rights relating to both individual database items, and the overall database.
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Practicalities

Data exchange formatting - This will depend on the service engaged.
  • Model 1: Supply of a list of identifiers (e.g. ISSN, ISBN, OCLC Number) as simple text.
  • Model 2: Supply of one or more identifiers on a ‘just-in-time’ basis to an API, which returns enhanced data such as book cover or ToC.
  • Model 3: Supply of ‘stub’ (very short) records in MARC, or other format to be enhanced.
  • Model 4: Supply of MARC records to third party platform, where records and additional enhancements are hosted.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Lifecycle implications - Model 2 has no implications. However, Models 1, 3 & 4 require regular supply of updated records, either by full export or changes (additions, updates and deletions) based on the original export.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Hosting requirements -
  • Models 1 & 2: Typically very low. In many cases, book jacket images are not even hosted on institutional servers.
  • Model 2: Small amount of local hosting required for ‘stub’ records.
  • Model 3: Hosting provided by 3rd party.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Existing systems impact - Models 3 and 4 have no significant impact. However, Model 2 is likely to require addition of HTML or Javascript to local record display. In some cases this is not possible within an LMS OPAC, although might be achieved through additional frameworks such as Juice (http://code.google.com/p/juice-project/).
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Skills demands - Integration of enrichments into OPACs and other systems may be more or less challenging, depending upon the system being used. Subject to LMS support of export of identifiers or partial or full MARC records based on specified criteria, the requirements of Models 1, 3 & 4 should fall within the capabilities of a systems librarian.
Part of use case: | Share your experience

Costs

Setup - The necessary export capability should already be included within the LMS or equivalent local systems. Configuration to meet specific requirements may require modest effort that will normally be within the abilities of systems staff. Access to third party data will typically involve signing a contract or license agreement, as well as either a one-off payment or commitment to an ongoing subscription.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Ongoing - Access to third party data may involve commitment to an ongoing subscription.
Part of use case: | Share your experience
Cost of doing nothing - No additional costs will be directly accrued through inaction. However, failure to innovate in this area may result in existing systems becoming increasingly dated in appearance and capability. This may lead to a decline in use within the institution, as potential users look elsewhere.
Part of use case: | Share your experience